Call for papers Special issue for the 50th Anniversary of NZEP

New Zealand Economic Papers will publish its 50th volume in 2016. This special edition of New Zealand Economic Papers will focus on important topics covering the past 50 years of the New Zealand economy and the study of economics in New Zealand. Papers on New Zealand economic history, the history of economic thought in New Zealand and long-term developments in the New Zealand economy will be particularly welcomed.

Please note that papers not specifically relating to New Zealand will be considered for acceptance if they cover broader topics relevant to economic history and the history of economic thought that may indirectly affect New Zealand.

New Zealand Economic Papers is a fully peer-reviewed scholarly journal (rated ‘B’ in the ABDC list) published by leading international publishers Taylor & Francis (under the Routledge imprint) on behalf of the New Zealand Association of Economists. The journal is indexed in leading international databases including EconLit, ABI/Inform and EBSCO.

Selection of papers for the special issue will follow peer review. Submissions should be made online. Please indicate that your paper is meant for the special issue for the 50th anniversary of NZEP during the submission process.

Submission deadline: 31st December 2015

Submission: To submit to New Zealand Economic Papers, go to: https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/rnzp

Editorial Team: The Editor-in-Chief is Associate Professor Gail Pacheco (Auckland University of Technology) and the Co-Editor is Professor Arthur Grimes (Motu Research and University of Auckland). Gail and Arthur are supported by several Associate Editors and an Editorial Board drawn from New Zealand and international institutions (list).

2014 NZEP Issue 2 a Special Issue on Population Ageing and Long-Run Fiscal Sustainability in New Zealand

The contents of New Zealand Economic Papers, Volume 48, Issue 2, 2014 (available online or by subscription):

  • Population ageing and long-run fiscal sustainability in New Zealand by Robert A. Buckle & John Creedy
  • The requirements for fiscal sustainability in New Zealand by Robert A. Buckle & Amy A. Cruickshank
  • New Zealand’s demographics and population ageing by Geoff Bascand & Kim Dunstan
  • Treasury’s 2013 long-term fiscal statement: Assumptions and projections by Matthew Bell & Paul Rodway
  • Population ageing and productivity: A survey with implications for New Zealand by Ross Guest
  • Population ageing and the growth of income and consumption tax revenue by Christopher Ball & John Creedy
  • Can fiscal drag pay for the public spending effects of population ageing in New Zealand? by John Creedy & Norman Gemmell
  • Social expenditure in New Zealand: Stochastic projections by John Creedy & Kathleen Makale
  • Modelling retirement income in New Zealand by Christopher Ball
  • The growth, equity, and risk implications of different retirement income policies by Andrew Coleman
  • Tax policy with uncertain future costs: Some simple models by Christopher Ball & John Creedy

2014 NZEP Issue 1 includes papers on recent NZ performance

The contents of New Zealand Economic Papers, Volume 48, Issue 1, 2014 (available online or by subscription):

  • Foreign acquisition and the performance of New Zealand firms by Richard Fabling & Lynda Sanderson
  • New Zealand households and the 2008/09 recession by Christopher Ball & Michael Ryan
  • The S-curve dynamics of trade between the US and Korea: Evidence from commodity trade by Mohsen Bahmani-Oskooee & Jia Xu
  • The composition of government expenditure with alternative choice mechanisms by John Creedy & Solmaz Moslehi
  • Comparing merger enforcement across jurisdictions – New Zealand versus the European Union and the United States by Michael Pickford & Qing Gong Yang
  • Should bonus points be included in the Six Nations Championship? by Niven Winchester

March 2013 NZEP considers NZ’s international imbalances

The contents of New Zealand Economic Papers, Volume 47, Issue 1, March 2013 (available online or by subscription):

  • New Zealand’s macroeconomic imbalances – causes and remedies: Guest editors’ introduction
  • New Zealand’s international competitiveness challenges and the Woody Allen syndrome
  • New Zealand’s risk premium
  • Making fiscal policy more stabilising in the next upturn: Challenges and policy options
  • Systemic risk measurement and macroprudential policy: Implications for New Zealand and beyond
  • The A R Bergstrom Prize in Econometrics: 2012

The future is now

It is a truism that Western economies face a demographic problem: more older people and fewer working-age people will mean a higher dependency ratio. This future problem, we are told, requires action now, Now, NOW! We must prepare for the future by raising the retirement age and reducing superannuation payments.

Except that the future is already here, and no one has pushed the panic button. Continue reading

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The intention of this blog is to highlight economists’ work and provide material to support education and general understanding, especially as it relates to economics in New Zealand. It is not a forum for advocacy (other than better use of economics). Posts are categorised as Events, Insights or NZAE News (includes subcategories). Posts are also tagged with the JEL Classification and/or as considered appropriate (see list below). Authors are generally Councillors of the NZAE. Anyone can provide comments. Any views expressed are not necessarily those of the NZAE.