Canterbury scientific integrity workshop 26-Oct-18

There is more and more evidence that findings from many scientific studies cannot be reproduced, casting doubt on the reliability of these studies. This will be discussed at a ‘Reproducibility and Integrity in Scientific Research’ workshop, University of Canterbury, October 26, 2018. Registration details at https://blogs.canterbury.ac.nz/intercom/2018/09/21/workshop-on-reproducibility-and-integrity-in-scientific-research/.

Aug 2018 AI (#62) includes recent awards and photos

Asymmetric Information Issue No. 62

Contents

  • Editorial
  • An interview with Paul Conway (by John Yeabsley)
  • The ‘Five Minute Interview’ (Christina Leung)
  • NZIER Economics Award 2018 Citation
  • NZAE Conference 2018 Awards
  • NZAE Conference 2018 Photos
  • Blogwatch (by Paul Walker)
  • GEN 2018 Annual Conference Notification
  • Environmental-Economic Accounting at Stats NZ
  • Creedy on Corden
  • WEAI Conferences, Save the Dates
  • 29th Australian & New Zealand Econometric Study Group (ANZESG) Meeting
  • NEW MEMBERS (for 2018 up to 1 August 2018)
  • The A R Bergstrom Prize in Econometrics, 2019

2018 NZEP Issue 2 includes whether state ownership is detrimental to performance

The contents of New Zealand Economic Papers, Volume 52, Issue 2, 2018 (available online or by subscription):

  • The fall (and rise) of labour share in New Zealand by Benjamin Bridgman & Ryan Greenaway-McGrevy
  • Business cycle accounting for New Zealand by Thakshila Gunaratna & Robert Kirkby
  • Artwork characteristics and prices in the New Zealand secondary art market, 1988–2011 by John Forster & Helen Higgs
  • New Zealand State-owned enterprises: is state-ownership detrimental to firm performance? by Kenny Ka Yin Chan, Li Chen & Norman Wong
  • Income effects and the elasticity of taxable income by John Creedy, Norman Gemmell & Josh Teng
  • The economists and New Zealand population: problems and policies 1900–1980s by Geoffrey T. F. Brooke, Anthony M. Endres & Alan J. Rogers
  • The effect of public funding on research output: the New Zealand Marsden Fund by Jason Gush, Adam Jaffe, Victoria Larsen & Athene Laws
  • Citation for John Gibson to mark his Distinguished Fellow Award by the New Zealand Association of Economists by Arthur Grimes

Ralph Lattimore elected NZAE Life Member

Ralph has been a longstanding member of the NZAE, including serving on the Council from 2003-2007. He was actively involved in proposing and furthering several initiatives which now a core part of the NZAE. Life membership was a particular push by Ralph, and he played a role in celebrating the early workers for NZAE Distinguished Fellows. Ralph was involved in the drive to set up a form of “lifetime achievement awards” to complement the annual Economist of the Year. He also wrote citations for several [Peter Lloyd and Brian Easton]. In terms of his contributions to the NZ economics profession more widely, Ralph along with Gary Hawke was keen to record our history, both economic and of the early economists. This had various aspects, but included their joint history of agriculture [Hawke & Lattimore (1999) Visionaries, Farmers & Markets: An Economic History of New Zealand Agriculture], their work on the early days of economics as a discipline [Hawke & Lattimore (2002) Scoping the History of Economics in New Zealand] plus of course the successive editions of the short macroeconomic history of NZ that started as A Briefing on the NZ Economy with Paul Dalziel.

Housing Unaffordability special issue call for papers

Housing Unaffordability: An International Economic Problem

Guest Editors:
Peter Phillips peter.phillips@yale.edu
Ryan Greenway-McGrevy r.mcgrevy@auckland.ac.nz

Housing has become increasingly expensive in many urban centres around the world, creating a global economic problem with no easy policy solutions. Housing unaffordability has a pervasive influence on many aspects of economic life. It impacts intergenerational equity, affects retirement decisions, labour mobility and immigration, and raises major policy challenges at both local and national government levels.

This Special Issue of New Zealand Economic Papers will be devoted to addressing these questions using evidence based economic analysis. We welcome research on all aspects of this global economic problem, including its causes, consequences, and policy responses, as well as methodological approaches to its study and empirical analysis.

Ranking: Australian Business Deans Council (ABDC) Journal Quality List – B ranking.

Submission: via the online portal at https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/rnzp

Please indicate that your paper is meant for the special issue on “Housing Unaffordability” during the submission process.
Selection of papers for the special issue will follow peer review.

Availability: New Zealand Economic Papers is a fully peer-reviewed scholarly journal published by leading international publishers Taylor & Francis (under the Routledge imprint) on behalf of the New Zealand Association of Economists.
The journal is indexed in leading international databases including EconLit, ABI/Inform and EBSCO.

Submission deadline: 31 March 2019

NZEP Call for papers Jun18

Apr 2018 AI (#61) includes research work at AUT

Asymmetric Information Issue No. 61 

Contents

  • Editorial
  • An interview with Leo Krippner (by John Yeabsley)
  • The ‘Five Minute Interview’ (Ronald Peters)
  • Blogwatch (by Paul Walker)
  • Obituaries: The Passing Parade
  • WEAI Conferences, Save the Dates
  • Introducing … The New Zealand Work Research Institute at AUT
  • (Motu) Retooling the Emissions Trading Scheme to ‘Decarbonise’ NZ (by Suzi Kerr, Catherine Leining, Joanna Silver, Phil Brown, Nigel Brunel, Sandra Cortes-Acosta, Stuart Frazer, Adrian Macey, Guy Salmon, and Paul Young)
  • Meanwhile … Activities of Possible Interest
  • NEW MEMBERS (for 2018 up to 1 April 2018)
  • Research in Progress (University of Canterbury)

Small business is personal

It started out as a simple question: is a $75,000 liquidator’s fee for the $117,000 sale of a small shop appropriate? Thus I enter the disreputable world of business deaths and promises not met. One online search leads to another and I start to question whether my combing of court liquidation records is proving informative or simply entertaining (a type of schadenfreude). Continue reading

Financial imbalances and financial fragility seminar (Mar-11)

Dr Frédéric Boissay of the European Central Bank will discuss the implications of financial integration and global imbalances in terms of output, welfare, wealth distribution, and policy interventions at the University of Auckland this afternoon. His modeling points to, on the one hand, financial integration permits a more efficient allocation of savings worldwide in normal times. On the other hand, however, it also implies a current account deficit for the developed country. The current account deficit makes financial crises more likely when it exceeds the liquidity absorption capacity of the developed country.

See Calendar of Events for other economic presentations in NZ.

Initial Christchurch earthquake impact on spending

Nationwide spending through the Paymark electronic payments network dropped 6% from year-ago levels on Tuesday 22 February, the day of the second major Christchurch earthquake, mostly due to a 33% spending drop in the Canterbury region. Subsequent to this there has been only partial recovery in Canterbury and some shift in spending to South Canterbury, but spending beyond these two regions has resumed at the faster-than-of-late 6% p.a. witnessed earlier in February.

Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell

We all like success. But do we really understand why some succeed and others do not? Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell is a superb book offering some insights. Just as importantly, it is readable. Gladwell is a story-teller. He has purposely pitched the book at the ‘popular audience’. He is doing something right judging by the book topping overseas best-seller lists recently.

Not surprisingly success is a combination of ability, effort and timing. It is the last two factors on which Gladwell focuses, suggesting for example that 10,000 hours of ‘practice’ was a huge part of the success of Bill Gates and the Beatles, as well as fortunate timing. Another interesting statistic is the prevalence of March quarter birthdays amongst top Canadian ice hockey players, suggestive that a 1 January cut-off for children’s sports teams has biased the chances of sporting success later in life.

The New Zealand Listener recently ran an extensive review of these themes, including a check on the birthdates of the All Blacks. And, yes, the same bias appears to be present.

Gladwell also explores the role of communication. Communication matters, especially in the cockpit of a commercial plane. You will be pleased to know that New Zealand pilots score well in terms of a “power distance index”. In plain terms, we are willing to speak up, even if the message will upset our supposed superiors. But don’t get too complacent: we don’t score so well when it comes to numbers – for a very logical reason, it turns out.

The stories and insights just keep on flowing, building a fascinating picture of success as a legacy. The popular myth is that of overnight success but more likely success builds gradually. So you are right, in part: it was your parents’ fault all along. But think again. Buried in your past are the seeds of your own success, be it a work ethic or an attitude or a stubbornness or merely some chance acquaintance.

The major criticism of the book appears to be ‘so what?’ The stories are entertaining but the key message is hardly new. That may be the case. But that does not disempower the book. To me, reconsidering what determines my likely success, and considering under what conditions I might succeed, is well worth the time.

You will probably enjoy this book if you liked: Black Swan, another recent top-seller jammed with wonderful stories by Nassim Taleb.

Welcome to the NZAE blog

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The intention of this blog is to highlight economists’ work and provide material to support education and general understanding, especially as it relates to economics in New Zealand. It is not a forum for advocacy (other than better use of economics). Posts are categorised as Events, Insights or NZAE News (includes subcategories). Posts are also tagged with the JEL Classification and/or as considered appropriate (see list below). Authors are generally Councillors of the NZAE. Anyone can provide comments. Any views expressed are not necessarily those of the NZAE.