GEN 2018 conference 9 Nov 2018

Improving peoples’ lives through effective policy

Ensuring policies are effective and achieve the desired impacts is harder than it seems. The conference will explore how economic analysis can help us to advise governments on the best ways to improve the quality of peoples’ lives.

Conference website

NZAE Conference 2019 early information

See dedicated conference website for more detail released nearer to the event.

Title: NZAE Conference 2019
Location: Rutherford House, Victoria University of Weellington
Description: Annual 3-day NZAE Conference
Start Date: 2019-07-03
Start Time: 08:00
End Date: 2019-07-05
End Time: 13:30

2019 Conference important dates:

  • Wednesday 20th February First notice of conference sent out
  • Wednesday 20th February Portal for abstract submissions opens
  • Friday 22nd March Final notice of conference sent out
  • Monday 25th March Conference registration opens
  • Monday 1st April Abstracts Due
  • By Monday 22nd April Notification of acceptances
  • Monday 13th May Registration deadline for presenters
  • Monday 13th May Deadline for early-bird registration
  • Monday 10th June Full papers due for entries to prizes
  • Wednesday 3rd July Conference start
  • Friday 5th July Conference end

PhD Workshop: Tuesday, 2nd July; venue TBD

2019 Conference keynotes:

Vacancy for macroeconomist at The Treasury closes 30 Oct 2018

ANALYSTS/SENIOR ANALYSTS (MACROECONOMIST)

See Job Ad and Position Description at Central Agencies. Some detail copied below …

Do you want to undertake influential analysis on fiscal policy and macroeconomic issues?
  • Are you passionate about the economy & macroeconomics?
  • Interested in contributing to a wide-range of economic policy issues?
  • Do you hold a relevant post-graduate degree?

The Treasury is the New Zealand Government’s lead economic and financial advisor. Our vision is to be a world-leading Treasury working towards higher living standards for New Zealanders.

We have an opportunity for an Analyst/Senior Analyst (Macroeconomics) to join our Forecasting, Modelling & Research Teams. This role would suit an Analyst with a few years of experience who is interested in applying their excellent quantitative skills to help shape policy and analytical work. For appointment at the senior level you will have proven macroeconomic analysis experience and evidence of excellent communication and influencing skills. You will be joining one of our three macroeconomic teams, which together represent one of the largest groupings of macroeconomic expertise in New Zealand.

Together, our teams are responsible for:

  • Monitoring and quantitative analysis on international and domestic economic developments
  • Advising the Government on monetary and fiscal policy frameworks, and on its fiscal strategy
  • Producing the economic and fiscal forecasts and projections published in the Budget and regular Economic and Fiscal Updates, and the Long-Term Fiscal Statement
  • Contributing to a wide range of economic policy issues and discussions both within the Treasury and externally, including through original research and modelling

In this role you will be responsible for:

  • Leading and contributing to the development of analysis on relevant macroeconomic and fiscal policy issues
  • Developing/maintaining/updating Treasury’s policy and forecasting models
  • Providing model based forecasts/policy advise
  • Conducting research and analysis to influence/inform policy
  • Working across teams to provide technical/modelling support and shaping debate

About You

  • A passion for macroeconomics, especially macroeconomic modelling
  • A strong post-graduate tertiary qualification in macroeconomics or related disciplines (economics, statistics or equivalent)
  • Demonstrated experience in delivering research projects and working collaboratively with others
  • Highly developed communication skills with the ability to engage with non-technical audiences to convey findings
  • Some experience working in a policy modelling environment
  • Experience working with time series econometrics, experience with VAR models or structural modelling would be an advantage
  • Programming experience would be an advantage

In return we can offer you:

  • Excellent mentoring support and work within a supportive, collaborative and high-performing team
  • Interesting and exciting work across a range of areas
  • The opportunity to bring new ideas and contribute evidence into policy
  • Flexible work arrangements to suit personal circumstances

At the Treasury, we pride ourselves on the quality of our staff and understand the importance of fostering a working environment where excellence is recognised and where staff are encouraged to develop their own talents and potential.  The Treasury values diversity amongst its employees and encourages a positive work/non work balance.

Applications close – Tuesday 30 October, 2018. All applications must be made online.

Please see link at top of this page for further detail and for more information please contact, Peter Gardiner, Manager – Forecasting, Modelling & Research Peter.Gardiner@treasury.govt.nz

Vacancy for Senior Economist at Commerce Commission closes 4 Nov 2018

Senior Economist, Regulation

The Commerce Commission is New Zealand’s competition, consumer and regulatory agency. Our vision is that New Zealanders are better off.

Our Regulation Branch is looking for a Senior Economist to join their Economics team and contribute to developing and delivering quality economic advice. This is a full-time position, based in our Wellington office.

Secondments from other organisations within or outside New Zealand are welcome.

The role

The Regulation Branch aims to ensure the performance of regulated suppliers and markets produces long-term benefits for New Zealand consumers.

Our regulatory responsibilities currently cover telecommunications, electricity and gas networks, airports and dairy sectors. You will be working alongside other experienced economists in a purposeful, stimulating and collegial environment providing advice to decision makers within the Commission and will be a key member of project teams. This will provide an opportunity to work on projects that have an impact on New Zealand consumers, involving innovative issues to expand your knowledge.

What you will have

You will be leading the thinking on economic issues and directly advising Commissioners on a course of action so will need to demonstrate:

  • experience working within regulatory or competition economics (eg in a regulated industry, for a regulator, competition authority or economic consultancy)
  • an understanding of microeconomics including industrial organisation or financial economics
  • enthusiasm and a willingness to learn
  • strong team work skills as part of a multi-disciplinary environment
  • strong communication and influencing skills
  • an ability to identify the main issues, be pragmatic and manage own work.

A postgraduate qualification in economics or a closely related field is desirable.

What we offer

At the Commission we are passionate about the work that we do and having a culture where everyone is valued.

We look for energetic, dedicated, motivated people who understand the principles of competitive markets, and are interested in ensuring the Commission delivers the benefits of competitive markets to New Zealand’s consumers and businesses.

The Commission has a friendly and collaborative environment where people enjoy interesting and challenging work. We’re fully committed to our values of respect, accountability, good judgement, excellence and integrity which we view as part of our work behaviours.

We have modern central city offices in Wellington and Auckland. We value work/life balance and are committed to everyone’s well-being. We place a high value on learning and development so that everyone has the opportunity to develop to their full potential.

Read more about this role in the Senior Economist Position Description.

Apply now

To apply, email your cover letter and CV to work@comcom.govt.nz

For any queries, contact Kylie Savage on 04 924 3612.

Applications close 5pm on Sunday, 4 November 2018.

Apr 2018 AI (#61) includes research work at AUT

Asymmetric Information Issue No. 61 

Contents

  • Editorial
  • An interview with Leo Krippner (by John Yeabsley)
  • The ‘Five Minute Interview’ (Ronald Peters)
  • Blogwatch (by Paul Walker)
  • Obituaries: The Passing Parade
  • WEAI Conferences, Save the Dates
  • Introducing … The New Zealand Work Research Institute at AUT
  • (Motu) Retooling the Emissions Trading Scheme to ‘Decarbonise’ NZ (by Suzi Kerr, Catherine Leining, Joanna Silver, Phil Brown, Nigel Brunel, Sandra Cortes-Acosta, Stuart Frazer, Adrian Macey, Guy Salmon, and Paul Young)
  • Meanwhile … Activities of Possible Interest
  • NEW MEMBERS (for 2018 up to 1 April 2018)
  • Research in Progress (University of Canterbury)

Canterbury scientific integrity workshop 26-Oct-18

There is more and more evidence that findings from many scientific studies cannot be reproduced, casting doubt on the reliability of these studies. This will be discussed at a ‘Reproducibility and Integrity in Scientific Research’ workshop, University of Canterbury, October 26, 2018. Registration details at https://blogs.canterbury.ac.nz/intercom/2018/09/21/workshop-on-reproducibility-and-integrity-in-scientific-research/.

2018 NZEP Issue 2 includes whether state ownership is detrimental to performance

The contents of New Zealand Economic Papers, Volume 52, Issue 2, 2018 (available online or by subscription):

  • The fall (and rise) of labour share in New Zealand by Benjamin Bridgman & Ryan Greenaway-McGrevy
  • Business cycle accounting for New Zealand by Thakshila Gunaratna & Robert Kirkby
  • Artwork characteristics and prices in the New Zealand secondary art market, 1988–2011 by John Forster & Helen Higgs
  • New Zealand State-owned enterprises: is state-ownership detrimental to firm performance? by Kenny Ka Yin Chan, Li Chen & Norman Wong
  • Income effects and the elasticity of taxable income by John Creedy, Norman Gemmell & Josh Teng
  • The economists and New Zealand population: problems and policies 1900–1980s by Geoffrey T. F. Brooke, Anthony M. Endres & Alan J. Rogers
  • The effect of public funding on research output: the New Zealand Marsden Fund by Jason Gush, Adam Jaffe, Victoria Larsen & Athene Laws
  • Citation for John Gibson to mark his Distinguished Fellow Award by the New Zealand Association of Economists by Arthur Grimes

Housing Unaffordability special issue call for papers

Housing Unaffordability: An International Economic Problem

Guest Editors:
Peter Phillips peter.phillips@yale.edu
Ryan Greenway-McGrevy r.mcgrevy@auckland.ac.nz

Housing has become increasingly expensive in many urban centres around the world, creating a global economic problem with no easy policy solutions. Housing unaffordability has a pervasive influence on many aspects of economic life. It impacts intergenerational equity, affects retirement decisions, labour mobility and immigration, and raises major policy challenges at both local and national government levels.

This Special Issue of New Zealand Economic Papers will be devoted to addressing these questions using evidence based economic analysis. We welcome research on all aspects of this global economic problem, including its causes, consequences, and policy responses, as well as methodological approaches to its study and empirical analysis.

Ranking: Australian Business Deans Council (ABDC) Journal Quality List – B ranking.

Submission: via the online portal at https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/rnzp

Please indicate that your paper is meant for the special issue on “Housing Unaffordability” during the submission process.
Selection of papers for the special issue will follow peer review.

Availability: New Zealand Economic Papers is a fully peer-reviewed scholarly journal published by leading international publishers Taylor & Francis (under the Routledge imprint) on behalf of the New Zealand Association of Economists.
The journal is indexed in leading international databases including EconLit, ABI/Inform and EBSCO.

Submission deadline: 31 March 2019

NZEP Call for papers Jun18

Small business is personal

It started out as a simple question: is a $75,000 liquidator’s fee for the $117,000 sale of a small shop appropriate? Thus I enter the disreputable world of business deaths and promises not met. One online search leads to another and I start to question whether my combing of court liquidation records is proving informative or simply entertaining (a type of schadenfreude). Continue reading

Financial imbalances and financial fragility seminar (Mar-11)

Dr Frédéric Boissay of the European Central Bank will discuss the implications of financial integration and global imbalances in terms of output, welfare, wealth distribution, and policy interventions at the University of Auckland this afternoon. His modeling points to, on the one hand, financial integration permits a more efficient allocation of savings worldwide in normal times. On the other hand, however, it also implies a current account deficit for the developed country. The current account deficit makes financial crises more likely when it exceeds the liquidity absorption capacity of the developed country.

See Calendar of Events for other economic presentations in NZ.

Initial Christchurch earthquake impact on spending

Nationwide spending through the Paymark electronic payments network dropped 6% from year-ago levels on Tuesday 22 February, the day of the second major Christchurch earthquake, mostly due to a 33% spending drop in the Canterbury region. Subsequent to this there has been only partial recovery in Canterbury and some shift in spending to South Canterbury, but spending beyond these two regions has resumed at the faster-than-of-late 6% p.a. witnessed earlier in February.

Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell

We all like success. But do we really understand why some succeed and others do not? Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell is a superb book offering some insights. Just as importantly, it is readable. Gladwell is a story-teller. He has purposely pitched the book at the ‘popular audience’. He is doing something right judging by the book topping overseas best-seller lists recently.

Not surprisingly success is a combination of ability, effort and timing. It is the last two factors on which Gladwell focuses, suggesting for example that 10,000 hours of ‘practice’ was a huge part of the success of Bill Gates and the Beatles, as well as fortunate timing. Another interesting statistic is the prevalence of March quarter birthdays amongst top Canadian ice hockey players, suggestive that a 1 January cut-off for children’s sports teams has biased the chances of sporting success later in life.

The New Zealand Listener recently ran an extensive review of these themes, including a check on the birthdates of the All Blacks. And, yes, the same bias appears to be present.

Gladwell also explores the role of communication. Communication matters, especially in the cockpit of a commercial plane. You will be pleased to know that New Zealand pilots score well in terms of a “power distance index”. In plain terms, we are willing to speak up, even if the message will upset our supposed superiors. But don’t get too complacent: we don’t score so well when it comes to numbers – for a very logical reason, it turns out.

The stories and insights just keep on flowing, building a fascinating picture of success as a legacy. The popular myth is that of overnight success but more likely success builds gradually. So you are right, in part: it was your parents’ fault all along. But think again. Buried in your past are the seeds of your own success, be it a work ethic or an attitude or a stubbornness or merely some chance acquaintance.

The major criticism of the book appears to be ‘so what?’ The stories are entertaining but the key message is hardly new. That may be the case. But that does not disempower the book. To me, reconsidering what determines my likely success, and considering under what conditions I might succeed, is well worth the time.

You will probably enjoy this book if you liked: Black Swan, another recent top-seller jammed with wonderful stories by Nassim Taleb.

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The intention of this blog is to highlight economists’ work and provide material to support education and general understanding, especially as it relates to economics in New Zealand. It is not a forum for advocacy (other than better use of economics). Posts are categorised as Events, Insights or NZAE News (includes subcategories). Posts are also tagged with the JEL Classification and/or as considered appropriate (see list below). Authors are generally Councillors of the NZAE. Anyone can provide comments. Any views expressed are not necessarily those of the NZAE.